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Lindsay, a nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, is inoculated with the coronavirus disease Morry Gash/Pool via REUTERS

White New Yorkers received 48% of the nearly 300,000 vaccine jabs given to residents so far, according to new city data.

Black and Latino residents made up 11% and 15% of vaccine recipients, respectively, as of January 31.

The CDC found Black and Latino Americans have gotten hospitalized with COVID-19 at 3.7 and 4.1 times the rate of white people, respectively.

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New data from New York City shows white people have gotten nearly half of COVID-19 vaccines so far.

White New Yorkers received 48% of the nearly 300,000 vaccine jabs given to residents so far. Black and Latino residents make up 11% and 15%, respectively.

Non-New York City residents have received 25% of the city’s vaccines. Among non-New Yorkers who got vaccinated in the city, white people got 59%, and Black and Latino 7% and 10%.

White people have made up fewer cases, hospitalizations, and deaths from COVID-19 in the city in comparison to Black and Latino residents, who have been hit hard by the virus. The rate of death among Black and Latino residents is 269 and 291 per every 100,000 people; the rate of death among white residents is 150 per 100,000.

New York City where white residents make up 42% population and Black residents make up about 24% has given out just over 500,000 vaccine jabs total as of January 31. The city does not have the race or ethnicity of 40% of adults who received at least one dose in NYC.

Read more: The most powerful people in Congress got their covid vaccines but no one seems to know when the thousands of people who keep Capitol Hill running will have their turns

The city’s data are consistent with reports from other areas in the US that show a racial disparity between who is getting first access to the COVID-19 vaccine. Insider’s Shelby Livingston analyzed data from six states that found white people gotten access to vaccines ahead of Black Americans and other racial minorities.

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In North Carolina, for instance, Black people comprise 22% of the population but just 11% of vaccine recipients, while white people make up 68% of the population and 82% of those vaccinated, according to The Associated Press.

The CDC found Black and Latino Americans have gotten hospitalized with COVID-19 at 3.7 and 4.1 times the rate of white people, respectively.

White New Yorkers who are above 65-years-old had gotten vaccinated at a higher rate, while Asian, Latino, and Black vaccine recipients skewed slightly younger. Healthcare workers got first access to the vaccine in New York City.

About 148,000 people got both shots needed for the full Moderna and Pfizer vaccine in New York City.

Johnson & Johnson, which just reported a 66% effectiveness at preventing COVID-19 from using its single-dose vaccine, is expected to file emergency authorization with Food and Drug Administration within weeks.

Got a tip? If you have information to share on individuals or businesses possibly skirting vaccine rollout rules, email aakhtar@businessinsider.com.

Experts warned Black Americans and other communities of color might be hesitant to get vaccinated in the US due to a history of racist medical experiments or overall mistrust of the healthcare system, Insider’s Aria Bendix reported. Latino Americans who communicate in Spanish, for instance, have missed crucial information on the vaccine due to the language gap.

Residents of Washington Heights, a predominately Latino neighborhood, said a nearby vaccination meant to service the community gave many doses to white people from other parts of the city and state, according to The City. Some people who work out outside the site could not communicate with the Spanish-speaking residents.

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